Session Title See it, shake it, set it: privacy awareness and control for mobile applications

Session Type Experience Report

Duration 45 minutes

Speaker(s) Arosha Bandara (Open University)

Dr. Arosha K. Bandara is a senior lecturer at The Open University, based in the Centre for Research in Computing.  His research focuses on addressing the practical problems associated with building and maintaining self- managing (adaptive) systems by combining rigorous formal techniques with concrete implementations and ap- plications of those techniques.  This interest in practical applications of formal techniques includes investigation of the usability of technologies that leverage such formalisms. Motivated by the increasing use of mobile computing applications, his current research investigates ways in which machine-learning techniques can improve the privacy management capabilities for users of such applications.  Further information can be found at http://mcs.open.ac.uk/akb235/.


Session Description

As a result of advances in ubiquitous computing areas, and the widespread use of related technology in various applications, it is now possible to capture an unprecedented amount of information about people’s daily lives and use this information in various ways. Proponents of these developments argue that they will allow computer technologies to inform, entertain and assist us in ways that are more comfortable, intuitive and unobtrusive. On the other hand, it is argued that such pervasive data gathering is likely to cause serious invasions of individual privacy, potentially culminating in harm to individuals and society at large.  This talk reports on research that has been investigating users' experience of managing their privacy when using mobile applications as well as techniques developed to better understand mobile privacy requirements.  The results show the efficacy of technical solutions for improving awareness by making privacy sensitive interactions more visible to the user and some initial results on using novel interaction modes for configuring privacy settings.